147: Intimate image abuse in adults and under 18s: A comparative analysis of cases dealt with by the Revenge Porn Helpline and Professionals Online Safety Helpline

SWGfL in partnership with the University of Exeter Economic and Social Research Council (October, 2019)

A summary of a qualitative study comparing intimate image abuse in Under 18s and adults. Data from the Revenge Porn Helpline and Professionals Online Safety Helpline (POSH) (based at South West Grid for Learning) were analysed. Four months of call and email case notes were sampled from each helpline. Individual contacts to the helplines were analysed using a thematic, inductive approach in order to investigate potential relationships between intimate image abuse in adults and under 18s, including effects on victims and perpetrator motivations.

146: Ofcom Adults: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 2

Critical Research/Ofcom (May 2019)

A summary of the results of Ofcom’s Adults’ Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with adults aged 16 and over (N = 1,882), conducted between September and November 2018. The report also draws on data from the Ofcom 2019 Technology Tracker survey. This quantitative study interviewed 3,909 adults aged 16 and over between January and February 2019. These studies examine the media environment for adults in the UK and provides evidence on how media use, attitudes and understanding have changed over time among this group.

145: Ofcom Adults: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 1

Critical Research/Ofcom (May 2019)

A summary of the results of Ofcom’s Adults’ Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with adults aged 16 and over (N = 1,882), conducted between September and November 2018. The report also draws on data from the Ofcom 2019 Technology Tracker survey. This quantitative study interviewed 3,909 adults aged 16 and over between January and February 2019. These studies examine the media environment for adults in the UK and provides evidence on how media use, attitudes and understanding have changed over time among this group.

144: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 2

Critical Research/Ofcom​ (June 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2060) conducted between April-June 2018. The report also draws on a complementary online news study with 1001 12-15 years olds conducted in two waves; November/December 2017 and March/April 2018.

143: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 1

Critical Research/Ofcom (June 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2060) conducted between April-June 2018. The report also draws on a complementary online news study with 1001 12-15 years olds conducted in two waves; November/December 2017 and March/April 2018.

 

142: Tackling Gaming Addiction in the UK

Daria Kuss (Nottingham Trent University) (March, 2019)

A summary of the key findings from a report examining how the addictive nature of some technologies can affect users’ engagement with gaming and social media, particularly amongst younger people. It was written as a response to the inquiry of the UK Parliament’s Select Committee on Digital, Culture, Media and Sport into Immersive and Addictive Technologies.

141: Children’s Data and Privacy Online: Growing Up in a Digital Age An Evidence Review

Sonia Livingstone, Mariya Stoilova and Rishita Nandagiri (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

A summary of the results of a project using systematic evidence mapping to review the existing knowledge base on children’s data and privacy online, identify research gaps and outline areas of potential policy and practice development. A comprehensive and methodical search strategy was utilised and included a broad range of sources including policy recommendations, case studies and advocacy guides. Three groups of search terms were combined to identify research about children, privacy and the digital environment. 

140: Inequalities in How Parents Support Their Children’s Development with Digital Technologies. Parenting for a Digital Future: Survey Report 4

Sonia Livingstone and Dongmiao Zhang (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

An overview of the key findings relating to the possible digital inequalities between more and less societally advantaged groups, focusing on gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), parental education, family composition, as well as special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities. A nationally representative survey was carried out of 2,032 parents of children aged 0-17. Participants were recruited via an online panel, supplemented with a sample of low or non-internet users interviewed in-person. Participants were representative by region across the UK, representative by ethnic background, socio-economic status (SES), gender, and inclusion of parents with low or no internet use. The data were collected in 2017.

139: What Do Parents Think and Do About Their Children’s Online Privacy? Parenting for a Digital Future: Survey Report 3

Sonia Livingstone, Alicia Blum-Ross and Dongmiao Zhang (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

A summary of the key results relating to how UK parents view their own and their children’s digital privacy, sharing images of their children online, and how they negotiate new norms about parents’ roles in supporting their child’s safety and fostering their independence online. A nationally representative survey was carried out of 2,032 parents of children aged 0-17. Participants were recruited via an online panel, supplemented with a sample of low or non-internet users interviewed in-person. Participants were representative by region across the UK, representative by ethnic background, socio-economic status (SES), gender, and inclusion of parents with low or no internet use. The data were collected in 2017.

138: When Do Parents Think Their Child is Ready to Use the Internet Independently? Parenting for a Digital Future: Survey Report 2

Sonia Livingstone (London School of Economics and Political Science) and Kjartan Ólafsson (University of Akureyri) (February, 2019)

An overview of the results of a study exploring the age at which parents think their children need to ask for consent, and the age at which children can manage their own data privacy. This is related to the implementation of the General Data Protection Regulation in May 2018. A nationally representative survey was carried out of 2,032 parents of children aged 0-17. Participants were recruited via an online panel, supplemented with a sample of low or non-internet users interviewed in-person. Participants were representative by region across the UK, representative by ethnic background, socio-economic status (SES), gender, and inclusion of parents with low or no internet use. The data were collected in 2017.