150: Ofcom Adults’ Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2020 Research

Critical Research/The Knowledge Agency/Ofcom (June 2020)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Adults’ Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey on media use, attitudes and understanding based on in-home interviews with adults aged 16+ (N=1,883), conducted between September-November 2019. The report also draws on our qualitative Adult’s Media Lives research, a longitudinal ethnographic study following largely the same 19 adults to provide in-depth insight into the role of media in their day-to-day lives.

146: Ofcom Adults: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 2

Critical Research/Ofcom (May 2019)

A summary of the results of Ofcom’s Adults’ Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with adults aged 16 and over (N = 1,882), conducted between September and November 2018. The report also draws on data from the Ofcom 2019 Technology Tracker survey. This quantitative study interviewed 3,909 adults aged 16 and over between January and February 2019. These studies examine the media environment for adults in the UK and provides evidence on how media use, attitudes and understanding have changed over time among this group.

145: Ofcom Adults: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 1

Critical Research/Ofcom (May 2019)

A summary of the results of Ofcom’s Adults’ Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with adults aged 16 and over (N = 1,882), conducted between September and November 2018. The report also draws on data from the Ofcom 2019 Technology Tracker survey. This quantitative study interviewed 3,909 adults aged 16 and over between January and February 2019. These studies examine the media environment for adults in the UK and provides evidence on how media use, attitudes and understanding have changed over time among this group.

122: Maximising Opportunities and Minimising Risks for Children Online: The Role of Digital Skills in Emerging Strategies of Parental Mediation

Sonia Livingstone, Kjartan Ólafsson, Ellen Helsper, Francisco Lupiáñez-Villanueva, Giuseppe Veltri and Frans Folkvord (Nov 2017)

A summary of the results of a large-scale survey exploring parental beliefs, concerns and actions in relation to parent and child online skills, risks and opportunities, and parental mediation. The survey questioned European parents aged 25-65 with children aged 6-14 living in their household and under their responsibility or care in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Poland, Italy, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. 800 interviews were conducted per country (N=6,400). Quota sampling was used with random sampling within age quotas (25-34, 35-49, and 50-64) to ensure a representative sample.

121: ‘Sharenting’, Parent Blogging, and the Boundaries of the Digital Self

Professor Sonia Livingstone and Dr Alicia Blum Ross (Nov 2017)

A summary of research examining how parent bloggers represent themselves as parents and the implications for those drawn into these representations (e.g., their children). The study conducted interviews with 17 parent bloggers, 13 identified as White and the remaining four as Asian, British Asian, or mixed race. Most had young children from toddlers through primary school age, and four had children with special educational needs and disabilities. Five of the 17 bloggers were fathers

118: Cyberbullying Among Young People

Directorate-General for Internal Policies, European Parliament (Nov 2017)

A summary of a report examining the extent, scope and forms of cyberbullying in the EU. It illustrates the legal and policy measures on cyberbullying adopted at the European and international levels, and delineates the EU role in this area. The study is based on research which covered all 28 EU Member States, as well as a closer analysis of the situation in nine Member States. The methods included an extensive literature review, consultation with experts, and a survey among young people aged 12-21 years in all EU Member States.

117: House of Lords: Growing Up with the Internet

House of Lords (Nov 2017)

A summary of the key findings and recommendations of the inquiry by the House of Lords’ Select Committee on Communications during 2016-17. It considered what skills children might need and the impact of the internet on children’s development, wellbeing and mental health. It also examined the rights children enjoy online, and what impediments there are to these. Evidence was gathered by a public call for evidence (written and oral), consulting a broad group of stakeholders and the views of young people.

116: Children’s Online Activities, Risks and Safety: A Literature Review by the UKCCIS Evidence Group

Professor Sonia Livingstone, Professor Julia Davidson and Dr Jo Bryce, with Saqba Batool, Ciaran Haughton, Anulekha Nandi, and the UKCCIS Evidence Group (Nov 2017)

A summary of the main findings of a literature review identifying trends, recent developments and emerging issues related to online risk of harm to children. The report examines implications for safety policy and practice using key results of recent qualitative and quantitative research. The review drew on the UKCCIS Research Highlights Series and the research reports they summarise, a call for evidence circulated during February 2017 to UKCCIS members and other experts, keyword searches of academic and grey literatures, as well as research reports and publications already known to the authors.

107: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes - Focus on Critical Understanding, Attitudes & Parental Controls

Ofcom (Nov 2016) 

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4. A sample of 2,059 parents and children were interviewed between April and June 2016. This Research highlights presents results related to children’s critical understanding, attitudes and parental mediation.