151: Increasing Safety and the Resilience of Children at Risk of Technology-assisted Child Sexual Abuse: Implementation Evaluation for InCtrl

NSPCC Research and Evidence (November 2020) 

A summary of the results of evaluation of the NSPCC InCtrl programme. This is a preventative service that aims to support children to safely enjoy online life by increasing safe online behaviours and digital resilience. The implementation evaluation examined (1) the feasibility of the pilot service, (2) whether the theory of change for InCtrl is evidenced, and (3) the factors that were barriers and facilitators to service delivery. Using mixed methods, the evaluation included analysis of case record data for 162 children referred to InCtrl during the pilot; two online surveys completed by practitioners; and 32 qualitative interviews and focus groups held with children, parents/carers and NSPCC staff.

149: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2019 Research

Critical Research/Ofcom (February 2020)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N=3,243), conducted between April-July 2019. The report also draws on Ofcom’s News Consumption Study, whereby 1,000 12-15-year olds were interviewed online in two waves: November/December 2018 and March/April 2019. Insights from our qualitative Children’s Media Lives study are also included, which follows 18 children aged 8-15; and data from audience measurement body, BARB.

148: Police response to youth offending around the generation and distribution of indecent images of children and its implications

Professor Andy Phippen, University of Bournemouth and Professor Emma Bond, University of Suffolk (2020).

A summary of a study exploring the arrest and crime recording of minors in the UK for the generation or distribution of indecent images of children, under the 1978 Protection of Children Act. A series of FOIA requests were sent to UK police forces asking for figures on the volume of arrests of minors under Home Office crime code 86/2, and also the number of outcome 21 recordings made against minors related to image offences, since December 2016. 30 police forces sent responses and the data were collated for the two categories (Home Office Crime code 86/2 and outcome 21) over the specified time period. Trends in the data were examined.

144: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 2

Critical Research/Ofcom​ (June 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2060) conducted between April-June 2018. The report also draws on a complementary online news study with 1001 12-15 years olds conducted in two waves; November/December 2017 and March/April 2018.

143: Ofcom Children and Parents: Media Use and Attitudes – Highlights from Ofcom’s 2018 Research 1

Critical Research/Ofcom (June 2018)

A summary of the results of the Ofcom Children’s Media Literacy Tracker, a large-scale quantitative survey based on in-home interviews with children aged 5-15 and their parents/carers, and with parents/carers of children aged 3-4 (N = 2060) conducted between April-June 2018. The report also draws on a complementary online news study with 1001 12-15 years olds conducted in two waves; November/December 2017 and March/April 2018.

 

141: Children’s Data and Privacy Online: Growing Up in a Digital Age An Evidence Review

Sonia Livingstone, Mariya Stoilova and Rishita Nandagiri (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

A summary of the results of a project using systematic evidence mapping to review the existing knowledge base on children’s data and privacy online, identify research gaps and outline areas of potential policy and practice development. A comprehensive and methodical search strategy was utilised and included a broad range of sources including policy recommendations, case studies and advocacy guides. Three groups of search terms were combined to identify research about children, privacy and the digital environment. 

140: Inequalities in How Parents Support Their Children’s Development with Digital Technologies. Parenting for a Digital Future: Survey Report 4

Sonia Livingstone and Dongmiao Zhang (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

An overview of the key findings relating to the possible digital inequalities between more and less societally advantaged groups, focusing on gender, ethnicity, socioeconomic status (SES), parental education, family composition, as well as special educational needs (SEN) and disabilities. A nationally representative survey was carried out of 2,032 parents of children aged 0-17. Participants were recruited via an online panel, supplemented with a sample of low or non-internet users interviewed in-person. Participants were representative by region across the UK, representative by ethnic background, socio-economic status (SES), gender, and inclusion of parents with low or no internet use. The data were collected in 2017.

139: What Do Parents Think and Do About Their Children’s Online Privacy? Parenting for a Digital Future: Survey Report 3

Sonia Livingstone, Alicia Blum-Ross and Dongmiao Zhang (London School of Economics and Political Science) (February, 2019)

A summary of the key results relating to how UK parents view their own and their children’s digital privacy, sharing images of their children online, and how they negotiate new norms about parents’ roles in supporting their child’s safety and fostering their independence online. A nationally representative survey was carried out of 2,032 parents of children aged 0-17. Participants were recruited via an online panel, supplemented with a sample of low or non-internet users interviewed in-person. Participants were representative by region across the UK, representative by ethnic background, socio-economic status (SES), gender, and inclusion of parents with low or no internet use. The data were collected in 2017.

133: Research for Culture and Education Committee (CULT) - Child Safety Online: Definition of the Problem

Brian O’Neill (Dublin Institute of Technology) (February, 2019)

An overview of the key findings from a briefing paper produced for the European Parliament’s CULT Committee which aimed to inform the process of implementing policies and initiatives to protect children and to identify crimes faced by children online, and document developments in information technology. It was based on the results of the EU Kids Online survey of 25,000 European 9- to 16-year-old internet users and their parents in 25 countries undertaken in 2010 (Livingstone et al., 2011), as well as the 2014 Net Children Go Mobile project - a similar survey focusing on mobile devices, with 3,500 European 9- to 16-year-old Internet users in 7 countries (Mascheroni & Cuman 2014).

132: Vulnerable Young People and Their Experience of Online Risks

Adrienne Katz (Youthworks) and Dr Aiman El Asam (University of Kingston) (February 2018)

A summary of the results of a large scale questionnaire study exploring the digital lives of those who are vulnerable offline compared to those of young people with no difficulties, as well as the relationships between five types of vulnerability and four categories of online risk. Data were collected via the annual Cybersurvey conducted in schools in Suffolk. Responses were obtained from 2988 young people aged 10-16 using an online questionnaire.